Archive for the ‘Garden’ Category

Pizza Pop Up

Roberta's Pizza

Roberta’s Pizza (c) Elisa Leonelli

I was checking their website to see if Sweetgreen had opened at Platform in Culver City (it has), and saw this page about Roberta’s Pizza. I was born in Italy, so I’m always on the lookout for authentic Neapolitan pizza restaurants in LA, and the photos of these pizzas looked promising. So today I went for lunch with a friend, we ordered one pizza to share, the Bee Sting with spicy soppressata, and after the first bite we had to immediately order a second. To be fair, these pies are quite small. They had set up a shack under the Expo line bridge, with wooden tables in front, and placed their awesome clay pizza oven outdoors.  I asked how long they were going to be there and they said they are leaving in 10 days, February 12, drive the pizza oven back to the original Roberta’s in Brooklyn. I told them that the parking lot for the Expo across the street would close on February 14, for construction of a commercial and residential complex, and they said, “We’re leaving just in time, then.”

Sweetgreen (c) Elisa Leonelli

Sweetgreen (c) Elisa Leonelli

We also did check out Sweetgreen, where you can get healthy salads, warm bowls, and fruit juices, made from local organic ingredients.
Platform is at 8840 Washington Blvd, Culver City 90232. See post on this blog.

Text and photos by Elisa Leonelli

Be water-wise

Autumm Joy Sedum

Autumm Joy Sedum

As you all know, California is experiencing a record drought.
Mandatory reduction measures in water-use are coming soon.

Meanwhile, you can make many water-saving improvements in your home and garden AND get rebates from DWP.
Install high-efficiency toilets and washing machine.
Collect water from gutters in rain barrels.
Replace your turf grass lawn with drought-tolerant landscaping.

For ideas on what plants to choose, visit LADWP’s California Friendly Landscaping

Walk around the Mar Vista Green Garden Showcase
Saturday April 25 from 10am to 4pm

Take a “Be Water-Wise” gardening class online from MWD (The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California)
Visit Descanso Gardens to get inspired by the recently opened Low-Water Beauty showcase, which includes a permeable driveway.

Attend Save Water-Save LA, town hall organized by SORONC Green Team
Sunday May 17: 12 to 3pm, at Castle Height School, 9755 Cattaraugus

Deni Mosser + Elisa Leonelli

Raised garden

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Look at what a Reynier Village neighbor did!
Jennifer: “This is the back wall area of my yard, the flooring is kitchen tile and concrete; it was a waste of space, since you can’t grow any plants here.  So I decided to hide the area with a raised garden.  I’m a full time mom with no woodwork experience, so I knew I wasn’t building a raised bed out of wood!  The easiest option for me was to lay down cinder blocks and pour in dirt. Some of my succulents plants have been transplanted here, I also plan on growing an herb garden.”

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Please let us know about YOUR garden experiments, email text and photo to: reyniervillage@earthlink.net

Jacaranda

Jacaranda 2s

Dozens of jacaranda trees have been blossoming in Reynier Village for the past few weeks, their violet purple flowers brightening the neighborhood and blanketing our streets; but they will soon be gone, so you may wish to walk around and enjoy them now!

Although not a native plant (it was first introduced to California in 1892), the jaracanda mimosifolia is beloved in literature by authors writing about by Los Angeles, such as Anais Nin, Raymond Chandler, Joan Didion. Click here for excerpts.
And often mentioned by Los Angeles writers, such as Kate Braverman, who left L.A. for San Francisco, and Eve Babitz, who named Jacaranda the protagonist of her 1979 novel Sex and Rage.

Text and photo by Elisa Leonelli

Good Karma Gardens

Good Karma 3s

Our good neighbor who grows bananas in his backyard, tipped us off about the Good Karma Gardens (GKG) in Mar Vista. They provide free guidance for people who wish to grow sustainable food in their backyard. Check it out!

Visit over 100 gardens, to learn about drought-tolerant landscapes, edible gardens, rainwater capture and more, during the

5th annual
Mar Vista GREEN GARDEN Showcase
Sunday April 20 from 10am to 4pm

Get inspired to start similar initiatives in Reynier Village.
Please let us know if you volunteer to do this and we’ll help you organize it.

Thanks!

Elisa Leonelli

Garden nurseries

Fuchsia, Veronica, Geranium, Aeonium, Tibouchina

Fuchsia, Veronica, Geranium, Aeonium, Tibouchina

As we were searching for plants to replace the old bamboo and create our new garden, we visited several nurseries. Here’s a list of some we liked.

Rolling Greens in Culver City, 9528 Jefferson Blvd, was the most amazing.  Too expensive for us to buy anything there, but great for looking at gorgeous specimens and get ideas.  You must check out their retail store at 7505 Beverly Blvd, they have beautiful items for your home and garden.
Grow Native in Westwood, 100 Davis Ave, is the perfect place to find drought-tolerant plants native to California.  Call for directions: 424-234 0481.
Two Dog Organic Nursery, 914 Cloverdale, is the perfect place to visit if you wish to start a vegetable garden, and they will give you plenty of expert advice as well.
Hashimoto Nursery, 1953 Sawtelle Blvd, is a traditional Japanese nursery with impeccable plants.
Yamaguchi Bonsai Nursery, 1905 Sawtelle Blvd., has a section devoted to California Natives.
Armstrong Garden Center, 3226 Wilshire in Santa Monica.  They offer gardening classes, and a lifetime guarantee for their fruit trees.

We picked a selection of fruit trees, shrubs and flowers, with the help of Sammy Lyon, permaculture designer and garden educator.

Text and photos by Elisa Leonelli

Avocado, white sage, Senetti Blue, geranium

Avocado, white sage, Senetti Blue, geranium

Meyer lemon, geranium, monkeyflower

Meyer lemon, geranium, monkeyflower

Redwood fence

I had seen inventive redwood fences with horizontal slats around the neighborhood (Holt and Halm), so, when it came to replace the old wood fences behind the thick bamboo hedge we had removed, I inquired about those custom choices, but they proved too expensive.  I settled for pre-assembled 6×8 feet dog-ear panels from Lowe’s; they only cost $70.31 each.  Then the lattice panels would be nailed on top to reach the more desirable 8-feet height and still conform to LA City codes.  I only discovered later, after the fence was built, that they had bought common not premium grade panels from Home Depot for $54.97 a piece. It would have cost only $150 more (out of a $10,000 total expense) to get the better quality panels, but I was never informed of this change.  Eventually, after the fence was painted with a transparent redwood stain to protect the wood from heat and humidity, it looked better, but you can still see through the knot holes.
Another problem that was too late to fix was that the landscape designer had assured me that the fence would all be the same height, even though one of the neighboring lots was higher than the other; but they did not adjust for the difference, so now I have a 6 inches gap where the 2 sides meet.
I was inexperienced and did not pay close enough attention, I trusted that the people I hired knew what they were doing. So I’m writing this warning for you to be more careful, if you attempt a similar project.  Please keep us posted if you do.

Text and photos by Elisa Leonelli