Spanish homes colors

California architects of the 1930s were influenced by Spain, Italy and Greece, as well as by Mexican and Native American adobe, while creating the Spanish-Mediterranean style.  The most distinctive features are red tiled roofs, arched openings, carved wood doors, wrought  iron gates, textured stucco walls.

Halm 2424

Beverlywood 8965-4Beverlywood 8925-4

The color palette of the walls tends to earth tones, including Navajo white, that can be effectively highlighted by aqua-green trims for doors and windows, a fit complement to the reddish roofs. The most common colors are a variety of terra-cotta shades, tans and beiges, matching and contrasting the color of the tiles.  Then there’s greens, from pea green to forest green.

Beverlywood 8945-3

But a true innovation, confirmed by the bold choice of a two-tone gravel landscaping with succulent plants, is this chocolate brown house.

Tell us about your color choices and be BOLD!!

Text and photos by Elisa Leonelli

2 responses to this post.

  1. I live across from 3 of the 4 homes pictured on Beverlywood and I get to look at these beautiful homes every day. I can tell you when we moved here in 1992 they were not much to look at. The bones were there but faded paint and old unkept gardens were the norm. My neighbors have put lots of TLC into their homes and I can appreciate each one. How boring they would be if they were all the same like tract homes.
    We too have a lovely 1932 Spanish home that I love and never get sick of looking at. We chose a Camel color for the stucco with very faint light Green for the trim. It looks great with the terra cotta roof tile and porch pavers.
    I love the Casa California Spanish Style Homes of the 20s &30s in L.A. and so many in our neighborhood .

    Reply

  2. Posted by Kevin on May 14, 2009 at 11:33 pm

    Although I no longer live on Beverlywood, it is great to see my old house pictured here. Also very nice to see that so many of you are still keeping up the good work on your yards, etc..

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: